Last edited by Gardat
Sunday, May 3, 2020 | History

4 edition of Fodder trees and shrubs of central Himalaya found in the catalog.

Fodder trees and shrubs of central Himalaya

K. Purohit

Fodder trees and shrubs of central Himalaya

by K. Purohit

  • 138 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by Gyanodaya Prakashan in Nainital .
Written in English

    Places:
  • India,
  • Garhwal (Region),
  • Kumaun.
    • Subjects:
    • Fodder trees -- India -- Garhwal (Region),
    • Fodder trees -- India -- Kumaun.,
    • Shrubs -- Utilization -- India -- Garhwal (Region),
    • Shrubs -- Utilization -- India -- Kumaun.,
    • Multipurpose trees -- India -- Garhwal (Region),
    • Multipurpose trees -- India -- Kumaun.,
    • Multipurpose shrubs -- India -- Garhwal (Region),
    • Multipurpose shrubs -- India -- Kumaun.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementK. Purohit and S.S. Samant.
      SeriesHimavikas occasional publication ;, no. 6
      ContributionsSamant, S. S., G.B. Pant Institute of Himalayan Environment & Development.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsSB193.3.I4 P86 1995
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxii, 116 p. :
      Number of Pages116
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL635698M
      ISBN 108185097380
      LC Control Number96900204
      OCLC/WorldCa35151463

      A rough list of Indian fodder-yielding trees, shrubs, and herbs. Ed. Government of India Central Print. Office; Report on a botanical tour in Kashmir. Reeditó en International Book Distributors. 18 pp. The orchids of the north-western Himalaya. Reeditó en Bishen Singh Mahendra Pal Singh; The botany of the Chitral. The Himalaya is the meeting-point of two bio-geographical regions. In most areas of the mountain range, flora and fauna from the Indo-Malayan Region are dominant, but in Kashmir, Ladakh, and northern Pakistan, and elsewhere at altitudes above c. 3, m, there is a large element of species from the West and North Asian Palaearctic Region.

      Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, 35 () Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam Structure and function of the agroforestry system in the Pithoragarh district of Central Himalaya: an ecological viewpoint P.K. Ralhan~, G.C.S. Negi2 and S.P. Singh2. t Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana (India) Cited by: These trees were later on defined as multipurpose trees which provide fodder, firewood and also replenish nutrients in soil. Many strides have been made to define characterize, evaluate multipurpose tree species for various agroforestry system under different agro-ecological zones of the world.

        The study attempts quantitative assessment of the use value of traditionally used woody species in a representative mid-Himalayan watershed of west Himalaya. Ethnobotanical surveys were conducted in the fringe villages of altitudinally diverse forested area of the watershed covering different age group respondents. A total of 34 woody species (27 trees and 7 shrubs) belonging to 25 families Author: Bhaskar Ch. Joshi, Ranbeer S. Rawal, K. Chandra Sekar, Aseesh Pandey. plants in the vicinity of Srinagar hydroelectric power project in Alaknanda valley of Garhwal Himalaya, India. We recorded plant species belonging to genera and 94 families from the study area. Out of the documented species were herbs, 74 shrubs, 73 trees and the rest 50 were climbers.


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Fodder trees and shrubs of central Himalaya by K. Purohit Download PDF EPUB FB2

Fodder trees and shrubs of central Himalaya K. Purohit, S.S. Samant Not In Library. Gliricidia sepium (Jacq.) Steud J. Sumberg Not In Library. Publishing History Network Workshop, 2 books Raj Kumar Gupta, 2 books Freddie Kwesiga, 2 books Leoncio Lojan Idrobo.

A large number of tree species, especially of conifers growing in the Himalaya and a few broad-leaved taxa in the peninsular region, have been dendrochronologically analyzed in India.

Kumaun 57 works Search for books with subject Kumaun. Search. Demography and development dynamics in a primitive tribe of Himalayas Prasanna Kumar Patra Not In Library. Fodder trees and shrubs of central Himalaya K. Purohit, S.S. Samant Not In Library. Borrow. Kumāum̐. Out of 67 fodder species, % were trees, % small trees and % shrubs.

Indigenous agroforestry system of Khokhan was dominated by G. oppositifolia. However, Q. floribunda was dominant. Important fodder trees/shrubs of temperate Himalaya: Distribution pattern and habitat affinities. In Training Course on Management and Utilization of fodder trees and shrubs in sub-tropical and temperate Himalaya.

Fodder trees and shrubs are used in Nepal as protein supplements in ruminant diets during the long dry period (October - May).

It is estimated that 12% of the total digestible nutrients (TDN) come from fodder tree and shrub leaves (New Era, ). The major source of leaf fodder is from the forest. Purohit K and Samant S S () Fodder trees and shrubs of Central Himalaya. Gyanodaya Prakashan, Nainital, India Rana M S and Samant S S () Diversity, Indigenous uses and conservation status of Medicinal plants in Manali Wildlife Sanctuary, Northwestern : Shiv Paul, S.

Samant, Manohar Lal, Jeet Ram. The Himalayan Vegetation along Horizontal and Vert Bird Migration across the Himalayas. Alpine vegetation types of the Central Himalaya. In Wielgolaski, High Altitude Flowering Plants of West Himalaya.

Howrah: Botanical Survey of India. Rawat, Cited by: 3. It involves the use of fodder trees and shrubs - trees that are permanent, and which will replace annual grasses; trees which will provide their own nitrogenous fertilisers; trees which will extend their roots deep beneath the ground to the water table.

This book is a simple-to-read manual providing wealth of information on the utilization of trees, shrubs, 11 undershrubs, 47 climbers (Adhesive-3spp; Beverage-3 spp; Brush-1 sp; Detergent-6 spp; Dye spp; Eyeliner-1 sp; Fibre spp; Fish poison-1 spp; Fodder spp; Fruits- 74 spp; Fuel spp; Human Ailments spp; Illuminants-1 sp; Incense-3 spp; Ink-2 spp; Local wine (sur) Forest diversity is the main source of livelihood of the people living in the Uttaranchal Central Himalaya.

Agriculture is the nucleus around which all the human activities are centered. Forest biodiversity is used for fodder, fuel wood, timber, leaf litter for manuring crop fields, construction, industrial raw materials and several non-timber.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus Missing: Fodder.

Grewia optiva, wonder tree of western Himalaya locally known as Bhimal is the most common multipurpose tree is a boon for the inhabitants of Garhwal Himalayan region.

About 2/3rd of the cultivated area of Garhwal is rainfed and Wheat (Triticum aestivum) is the predominant food grain crop cultivated on the sloppy terraces in combination of G.

optiva trees on terrace bunds. Singh B, Bhatt BP, and Prasad P. Variation in seed and seedling traits of Celtis australis, a multipurpose tree, in Central Himalaya, India, Agrofore- stry Systems, ; [45] Singh RV. Fodder Trees of India. such as herbs (44%), trees (29%), shrubs (24%), climbers (3%), which were further classify according to Kumaun region of Central Himalaya, the central tarai region includes a higher diversity of observed that both women and men were collected plants for fodder, fuel, and food value from the Author: Neha Chopra, Naveen Pandey, Lalit M Tewari, Ashish Tewari.

conservation of medicinal plants in central Himachal Pradesh, North Western Himalaya Pooja Kumari, SS Samant and Sunil Puri Abstract Indian Himalayan Region (IHR) is the rich repository of medicinal plants.

Inhabitants are largely dependent on the forest resources particularly on medicinal plants. The present paper is an attempt toAuthor: Pooja Kumari, SS Samant, Sunil Puri. During I was in Pithoragarh (Middle Himalaya), there women continued to do most of the animal husbandry related tasks, they spent substantial time on fodder collection, hey making (in some places I provided training to make hay and silage too) etc.

but the life of women there remained same regarding fodder needs for their livestock. Degraded hillsides in Northern Pakistan are rehabilitated through social forestry campaigns using fast growing exotic trees.

These plantations on former scrublands curtail access by livestock owned by landless pastoralists and create social tension. This study proposes an alternative strategy of planting indigenous fodder trees and shrubs that are well-suited to the local socio Cited by: Biodiversity / Plants Trees Trees largely predominate the temperate belt of GHNP.

The conifer species are widely distributed at various altitudes (e.g., blue pine, cedar, spruce, and fir) in the successive low to high altitudinal zones. Each of the upper coniferous belt has its characteristic oak which provide acorns for birds and rodents.

The white-oak. Across nine surveyed villages, a total of 30 plants (26 trees, 4 shrubs) were being collected for fuel purpose by the inhabitants. Mean fuelwood collection by households ranged from (kg hh−1 year−1) in high-altitude villages to (kg hh−1 year−1) in low by: 1.

Two species are recorded in the Red Data Book of Indian Plants as rare-endangered e.g. Cypripedium cordigerum (Rare); Dioscorea deltoidea (Vulnerable).

trees (75), shrubs (69),herbs()andpteridophytes(7),belonging to families and genera. These species are Central America Himalaya** Himalaya** India, SE Asia Timber Cupressus.The banj oak (Quercus leucotrichophora A. Camus) is an evergreen oak tree of Asia, and particularly of the Central Himalayas.

Morphology. The bank oak grows to a height of m (PFAF, ; Forestry Nepal, ). Banj oak has a full, rounded canopy. The bark is a smooth tan-brown at first, becoming lightly furrowed and corky with age.The moru oak (Quercus floribunda Lindl.

ex A. Camus) is a large evergreen tree from the Himalayan logy. Quercus floribunda has a dense crown, with a straight trunk that can reach a height of 45 m and a diameter up to 2 bark turns dark grey or dark reddish brown with age and exfoliates in irregular woody scales.

Moru leaves are shiny green, lanceolate to elliptic, cm.